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Skin Oxygenation

(English) wetality women blog

The oxygen concentration in a healthy human body is approximately three times that of the air. About 80% of all metabolic energy production is created by oxygen. Fortunately, oxygen is the most abundant element on Earth. Scientists now also agree that oxygen plays a powerful and primary role in our overall health and well-being. A growing number of researchers agree that the best way to improve health may be related to the optimum oxygenation of every cell.

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Sage, the Savior – Salvia Officinalis

(English) natural cosmetics

Sage has one of the longest histories of use of any culinary or medicinal herb.

Besides being very helpful in relieving many health symptoms, this plant is widely used in the preparation of foods because of its flavoring and seasoning properties.

It was used by Ancient Egyptians and Old Greek herbalists. Traditionally, the leaves have been made into a poultice and used externally to treat sprains, swelling, ulcers, and bleeding.

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(English) Basil, for Body and Soul

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Contains Antimicrobial Properties that Fight Viruses and Infections

Basil essential oils have been found to exhibit anti-microbial activity against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts, molds, and viruses. This means you can add protection against the candida virus and various forms of skin irritations to the long list of proven benefits of basil.

This herb is used across the world because of its health and nutritional benefits, aroma, scent. It is considered as holy in some transitions and used in rituals. Basil’s purpose is to help, cleanse and soothe for many centuries to come.

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(English) Vitamin B Complex

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B5 – Pantothenic Acid:

Widely available in plant and animal food sources, B5 helps support cellular energy production in the body. Rich sources include organ meat (liver, kidney), egg yolk, whole grains, avocados, cashew nuts, peanuts, lentils, soybeans, brown rice, broccoli, and milk.

Vitamin B6 – Pyridoxine:

Involved in over 100 cellular reactions throughout the body, vitamin B6 is instrumental in keeping various bodily functions operating at their best. It is needed to metabolize amino acids and glycogen (the body’s storage form of glucose) and is also necessary for normal nervous system function and red blood cell formation. Vitamin B6 is fairly abundant in the diet and can be found in foods such as meat, poultry, eggs, bananas, fish, fortified cereal grains and cooked spinach.

B7 – Biotin:

Biotin, or vitamin, is commonly found in foods such as brewer’s yeast, strawberries, organ meat, cheese, and soybeans. For those who are biotin deficient, studies show that biotin may help support healthy hair, skin, and nails. Biotin also supports carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism.

B9 – Folic Acid:

Folic acid is most commonly known for its role in fetal health and development as it plays a critical role in the proper development of the baby’s nervous system. This important developmental process occurs during the initial weeks of pregnancy, and so adequate folic acid intake is especially important for all women of child-bearing age. Fortified foods such as bread and cereals are good dietary sources of folic acid. Other good sources are dark green leafy vegetables such as asparagus and spinach as well as brewer’s yeast, liver, fortified orange juice, beets, dates, and avocados.

Vitamin B12 – Cobalamin:

Plays a critical role in the pathways of the body that produce cellular energy. It is also needed for DNA synthesis, proper red blood cell formation and for normal nervous system function. B12 is predominantly found in foods of animal origin such as chicken, beef, fish, milk, and eggs.

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Vitamin C – Potent Antioxidant

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Sources of Vitamin C

Vitamin C is easy to get through food because many fruits and vegetables contain it. Good sources include: apples, asparagus, berries, broccoli, cabbage, melon (cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon), cauliflower, citrus fruits (lemons, limes, oranges), kiwi, fortified foods (bread, grains, cereal), dark leafy greens (kale, spinach), pepper (especially red bell pepper, which has among the highest per-serving vitamin C content), potatoes, and tomatoes.